Useful information

How do I become an audio describer?


The first port of call is to visit a play or production where Audio Description is happening, attend the touch tour and listen into the audio description, if you are still interested in becoming an Audio Describer get in touch for information on our training courses and workshops to get you start, you do not need to be a member to attend ADA workshops so for the cost of a half day's workshop you can sample what goes into being a professional describer and get to meet and discuss the options with our describers.

Most describers are freelance with portfolio of venues. Being an Audio Describer combines well with other freelance activities such as acting, broadcasting, voiceover work, training, access work and captioning.

You will find a fill list of Training courses listed on our website, take a look to see what is involved, most of the courses are booked through venues but it is always worth discussing the options with our training supervisor. Audio Description Association courses are open to all describers. For Audio Description in Scotland see ADA Scotland who provide training and advice on all things audio description for those living on or across the border in Scotland,  go to their website adascotland.com for more information.

 

Which agencies provide audio description?


Along with a variety of smaller freelance based companies, VocalEyes support museums, galleries and heritage sites across the UK, offering live audio description and touch tours for events, scripting and production of recorded audio guides, and training of museum staff in visual awareness, guiding and audio description.

Mind’s Eye, run by Anne Hornsby, operates nationally across most genres and employs 10 accredited freelance describers.

Sightlines, run by a trio of describers – Jonathan Nash, Margaret Spittles and Julia Grundy – work in all theatrical genres and specialises in opera.  They currently work for Welsh National Opera, the Royal Opera House and theatres in Birmingham, Nottingham and Oxford.  They occasionally employ additional describers.

Bridge Arts and Culture, run by Amanda Wright, work across genres, and employ accredited describers.  Bridge’s books are currently full, but CV’s emailed to info@bridgeac.com will be filed for future reference.

VocalEyes, support museums, galleries and heritage sites across the UK, offering live audio description and touch tours for events, scripting and production of recorded audio guides, and training of museum staff in visual awareness, guiding and audio description.

Other freelance describers market themselves to theatres in their area, providing a valuable service to blind and partially sighted patrons and helping venues fulfil their obligations under the Equality Act.
See the Directory for details.

Audio Description is available across a whole range of arts and entertainment fields, a small number of full-time and part-time audio description opportunities are provided by broadcasters and associated agencies for more information please contact info@audiodescription.co.uk or view our directory for additional contacts.